Ventilation

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  • Passive ventilation
    Passive ventilation is the process of supplying air to and removing air from an indoor space without using mechanical systems. It refers to the flow of external air to an indoor space as a result of pressure differences arising from natural phenomena. There are two types of natural ventilation occurring in buildings: wind-driven ventilation and buoyancy-driven ventilation. The page also covers topics such as passive ventilation systems with heat recovery, architectural engineering, green building, and thermal comfort[1].
  • Passive cooling
    Passive cooling is a building design approach that focuses on heat gain control and heat dissipation in a building to improve indoor thermal comfort. It works by preventing heat from entering the interior or by dissipating heat using on-site energy and architectural design, rather than mechanical systems. The page also discusses various passive cooling technologies and their applications, such as ventilative cooling, windcatchers, and yakhchāls[2].
  • Ventilation (architecture)
    This page provides information on ventilation in architecture, including natural ventilation, which is the intentional passive flow of outdoor air into a building through planned openings. It covers the use of ventilation to control indoor air quality, temperature, humidity, and air motion. The page also discusses mechanical ventilation and its relationship to heating and cooling systems[3].
  • Modes of mechanical ventilation
    This Wikipedia article focuses on different modes of mechanical ventilation, including passive ventilation in the context of high-frequency ventilation. It explains the term “passive” in the context of ventilatory support systems and provides information on various ventilation modes and strategies[4].
  • Mechanical ventilation
    The page covers mechanical ventilation, which includes both positive pressure ventilation and negative pressure ventilation. It explains the types of mechanical ventilation, the healthcare providers involved, and the use of invasive and non-invasive ventilation. The article also discusses the various aspects of mechanical ventilation, such as breath control, exhalation, and alarm conditions[5].

Citations:
[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_ventilation
[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_cooling
[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventilation_(architecture)
[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modes_of_mechanical_ventilation
[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanical_ventilation

Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
ventilation (noun)
1.
the act or process of - ventilating
2.
a) circulation of air - a room with good ventilation
b) the circulation and exchange of gases in the lungs or gills that is basic to respiration
3.
a system or means of providing fresh air

Passive ventilation is the process of supplying air to and removing air from an indoor space without using mechanical systems. It refers to the flow of external air to an indoor space as a result of pressure differences arising from natural forces.

The ventilation system of a regular earthship
Dogtrot houses are designed to maximise natural ventilation.
A roof turbine ventilator, colloquially known as a 'Whirly Bird' is an application of wind driven ventilation.

There are two types of natural ventilation occurring in buildings: wind driven ventilation and buoyancy-driven ventilation. Wind driven ventilation arises from the different pressures created by wind around a building or structure, and openings being formed on the perimeter which then permit flow through the building. Buoyancy-driven ventilation occurs as a result of the directional buoyancy force that results from temperature differences between the interior and exterior.

Since the internal heat gains which create temperature differences between the interior and exterior are created by natural processes, including the heat from people, and wind effects are variable, naturally ventilated buildings are sometimes called "breathing buildings".

Ventilation (Wiktionary)

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French ventilation, from Old French ventilacion, from Late Latin ventilatio, from Latin ventilo.

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